Spine Surgery Patient Outcomes


  • At Memorial Spine, we proudly share our medical outcomes and patient feedback.

    Any time you have surgery, there is a risk of complications. We follow proven standards of care and go to great lengths to reduce the risk of complications. The table below shows how often our patients have had complications after surgery. The first column lists a possible complication. The next column shows what percentage of spine surgery patients at Memorial University Medical Center experienced this complication. The last column shows the benchmark score so you can reference how we compare to similar hospitals around the country. A lower score is better.

      Memorial Spine,
    2013 Total
    Memorial Spine,
    2014 Total
    Memorial Spine,
    2015 Jan.-March
    Benchmark
    Possible Complications (Click on each term to learn more)
    Readmitted to the hospital within 30 days 2.52% 2.99% 1.42% 3.26%*
    Infection within 30 days 1.07% 0.37% 0.34% 1%**
    Paralysis or nerve injury 0% 0% 0% 0.22%*
    CSF leak 0.39% 0.56% 0% 5%*
    Blood clots 0% 0% 0% 0.12%*
    Inpatient deaths 0% 0% 0.35% 0.038%*
    Additional surgery within one year 1.26% 1.78% 1.77% 2%*

    *Benchmark is from Premier healthcare alliance database
    **Benchmark is based on current data in medical literature

    The scores below are based on responses from patients completing a discharge survey after spine surgery at Memorial University Medical Center.  Patients are asked to rate the care using a five point scale ranging from very dissatisfied/never to very satisfied/always.  The numbers below represent the percentage of people who gave us the highest score possible, also known as the “top box score.” In this table, a higher score is better.

      Top Box Scores
    2015 Jan. to July
    Memorial Spine Goal
    Overall satisfaction
    90.86% 90%
    Promptness of pain management 92.35% 90%
    Oswestry Disability Index (ODI)

    The graphs below show how our patients measured their pain or disability before and after surgery. The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) has been used for more than 30 years and is considered the “Gold Standard” for measuring disability due to low back pain.

    Patients are asked to rate specific factors, including intensity of pain, lifting, ability to care for oneself, ability to walk, ability to sit, sexual function, ability to stand, social life, sleep quality, and ability to travel. We measure patients before surgery (ODI baseline), and 3 months (3M), 6 months (6M), and 1 year (1Y) after surgery. In the tables, “N” refers to the number of patients surveyed. This is how patients rate their ODI:

    • 0% to 20%: Minimal disability 
    • 21%-40%: Moderate disability 
    • 41%-60%: Severe disability
    • 61%-80%: Crippling back pain 
    • 81%-100%: These patients are either bed-bound or have an exaggeration of their symptoms

    Lumbar graph   

    Neck Disability Index (NDI)

    The Neck Disability Index (NDI) is a modification of the ODI to measure the amount of disability caused by neck pain. Patients are asked to rate specific factors, including intensity of pain, lifting, ability to care for oneself, reading, headaches, concentration, work, driving, sleep quality, and recreation. We measure patients before surgery (NDI baseline), and 3 months (3M), 6 months (6M), and 1 year (1Y) after surgery. In the tables, “N” refers to the number of patients surveyed. This is how patients score their NDI:

    • 0-4 no disability
    • 5-14 mild disability
    • 15-24 moderate disability
    • 25-34 severe disability
    • Above 34 complete disability 
    Cervical Graph