Angiography

  • Graphic of skull and brainAngiography is used to find problems or blockages in the arteries. A catheter is inserted through a small incision in the groin area. A physician guides the catheter to the area where the blockage is suspected. Next, dye is injected into the arteries while X-ray images are taken. The dye highlights the arteries, allowing the physician to accurately pinpoint the blockage.

    You will be asked to lie flat for six hours after angiography. If there is no bleeding or bruising at the catheter insertion site, you will be allowed to go home. You will probably be asked to return for angioplasty to repair the blockage. This is a process that involves surgically implanting a balloon or stent to re-open the blocked artery.

    Biplane Angiography Suite
    The Heart & Vascular Institute at Memorial University Medical Center has a biplane angiography suite. This unique facility enables physicians to get a 3D angiography image of the brain. If a person is brought to our emergency department with stroke symptoms, physicians can perform a biplane angiogram and see if an ischemic stroke is occurring. They then take quick action to stop the stroke before massive damage or death occurs.

    Carotid Angiography and Angioplasty
    If you are at risk for carotid artery disease or stroke, your physician may recommend a test called an angiogram. A special dye is injected into your carotid vessels to make them show up well on an X-ray. If the angiogram shows that the carotid arteries on either side of your neck are narrow or blocked due to plaque build-up, your physician may suggest angioplasty to treat the problem. With this procedure, a catheter is used to create a bigger opening in the vessel to increase blood flow. There are different types of angioplasty procedures. You and your physician will determine which type is best for you.

    Cerebral Angiography and Angioplasty
    If you are at risk for stroke, your physician may recommend a this type of angiogram. A special dye is injected into your cerebral vessels to make them show up well on an X-ray. If the angiogram shows that the vessels that carry blood through your brain are narrow or blocked due to plaque build-up, your physician may suggest angioplasty to treat the problem. This involves using a catheter to create a bigger opening in the vessel to increase blood flow. 

    Peripheral Angiography and Angioplasty
    If your physician suspects that vessels in any part of your body, including the limbs, may be blocked due to plaque build-up, he or she may recommend this type of angiogram. A special dye is injected into your vessels to make them show up well on an X-ray. If the angiogram shows blockage in your legs or any other part of your body, your physician may suggest angioplasty to treat the problem.

  • Contact Us
    • The Heart & Vascular Institute at Memorial University Medical Center
      4700 Waters Avenue
      Savannah, GA 31403
      912-350-HAVI (4284)
  • Learn More
    • More about cardiac angiography